[PhD Cakes] Gathering 22.11.17, Speakers: Brett Chenoweth and... you?

Datum objave: 17. 11. 2017
Srečanja doktorskih študentov
Wednesday, 22. 11. 2017, at 15:00 at Mafija, FMF, Jadranska 21, Ljubljana
Dear everybody,

The next PhD Cake gathering is upon us this coming Wednesday, November 22, 17, and so far the responses for talks are not balanced:

100 percent maths


In other words: we are still looking for a physics talk.

I overheard some mathematicians, apparently some of them also had some physical classes in their undergrad days, and they're thinking of giving a talk. So unless you want the mathematicians to deliver both the maths and the physics talk, please suggest a topic;) More seriously, if nobody steps up there will be only one talk. The talk does not have to be super polished, it will not be broadcast, just tell us what your research is about.

Your talks go here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/17pMpLasys5SEOxoABX6gw9KvCPIFo_ZjHQ8UH5Hm8F8/

We also look for a cake! There has been one brave volunteer so far, so please consider signing up. All the free coffee will not be enjoyable without any cake. (that's right, I said * free coffee * It's not official yet so I can not promise anything, but hopefully by Monday it will be, and FMF will pay for our coffee 😀)

Your cakes go here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1vWiIq0mwlEhJOyFY4LkInnxvCzmNmQxjrUrSTZTyD6Q/


And now I have the pleasure of announcing the first maths talk:


Brett Chenoweth: Flexibility and Rigidity in Complex Analysis

Abstract:
The main objects we study in complex analysis are holomorphic functions (also known as holomorphic maps). These functions are quite rigid in the sense that a holomorphic function on a domain is uniquely determined by its values on a small subset of its domain. This is in sharp contrast to continuous functions that are relatively flexible. It is therefore surprising that in certain circumstances the space of holomorphic maps and the space of continuous maps have the same 'rough shape'. This relates to some basic ideas from the Oka theory, which is an active subfield of complex analysis. In this talk, we will be considering the case when the source and the target are domains in C. This is a nice case to consider because all the complicated notions are easily understood here, and yet we still have a lot of illustrative examples.


Thanks for participating, enjoy your weekend and see you next Wednesday,

Philipp